by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832)
Translation © by Emily Ezust

Komm mit, o Schöne, komm mit mir zum...
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): DUT ENG FRE
Die Gleichgültigen:
 Komm mit, o Schöne, komm mit mir zum Tanze;
 Tanzen gehöret zum festlichen Tag.
 Bist du mein Schatz nicht, so kannst du es werden,
 Wirst du es nimmer, so tanzen wir doch.
 Komm mit, o Schöne, komm mit mir zum Tanze;
 Tanzen [verherrlicht den]1 festlichen Tag. 

Die Zärtlichen:
 Ohne dich, Liebste, was wären die Feste?
 Ohne dich, Süße, was wäre der Tanz?
 Wärst du mein Schatz nicht, so möcht ich nicht tanzen,
 Bleibst du es immer, ist Leben ein Fest.
 Ohne dich, Liebste, was wären die Feste?
 Ohne dich, Süße, was wäre der Tanz? 

Die Gleichgültigen:
 Laß sie nur lieben, und laß du uns tanzen!
 Schmachtende Liebe vermeidet den Tanz.
 Schlingen wir fröhlich den drehenden Reihen,
 Schleichen die andern zum dämmernden Wald.
 Laß sie nur lieben, und laß du uns tanzen!
 Schmachtende Liebe Vermeidet den Tanz. 
               
Die Zärtlichen:
 Laß sie sich drehen, und laß du uns wandeln!
 Wandeln der Liebe ist himmlischer Tanz.
 Amor, der nahe, der höret sie spotten,
 Rächet sich einmal, und rächet sich bald.
 Laß sie sich drehen, und laß du uns wandeln!
 Wandeln der Liebe ist himmlischer Tanz.

E. Křenek sets stanza 4

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
Note: In the Brahms setting, when addressing the opposite sex, the female singers sing "Liebster", "Schöner", and "Süsser"; and the male singers sing "Liebste", "Schöne", and "Süsse".
1 Brahms: "gehöret zum"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) [singable] (Lau Kanen) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Emily Ezust) , "Dialogue at the dance", copyright ©
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , "Chanson alternée pour danser", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Last modified: 2015-09-24 18:30:32
Line count: 28
Word count: 184

Dialogue at the dance
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
The indifferent ones:
 Come with me to the dance, o beauty;
 dancing is right for a festive day.
 You can become my sweetheart if you are not,
 but if you will never be, we can just dance.
 Come with me to the dance, o beauty;
 dancing glorifies a festive day.
 
The tender ones:
 Without you, dearest, what would a festival be?
 Without you, my sweet, what would a dance be?
 If you were not my sweetheart, I would not want to dance.
 If you stay my sweetheart forever, life will be a celebration.
 Without you, dearest, what would a festival be?
 Without you, my sweet, what would a dance be?
 
The indifferent ones:
 Let them love, but let us dance!
 Languishing love shuns the dance.
 Let us merrily weave about in spinning rows,
 and let the others creep off into the twilit wood.
 Let them love, but let us dance!
 Languishing love shuns the dance.
 
The tender ones: 
 Let them twirl, and let us wander!
 Wandering in love is a heavenly dance.
 Cupid is nearby and hears this mockery;
 he will have revenge someday - and soon!
 Let them twirl, and let us wander!
 Wandering in love is a heavenly dance.

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- https://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.


Based on

 

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:30
Line count: 28
Word count: 201