Translation by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

Степью иду я унылою
Language: Russian (Русский)  after the Hungarian (Magyar) 
Степью иду я унылою,
нет ни цветочка на ней;
[Нету зелёного дерева]1,
где бы мог спит соловей.

Мрачно так вечер насупился,
звезд ни следа в вышине...
Сам я не знаю, что вспомнилась
вдруг в эту нору ты мне!

Вспомнилась, ты, моя милая,
с кротким [и ясным лицом]2...
Вижу тебя и, мне кажется,
мгла уж редеет кругом:

и будто песнь соловьиная
в чаще зеленой звучит:
волны цветов колыхаются,
в звездах все небо горит...

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Gretchaninov: "derevca netu zeljonogo"
2 Gretchaninov: "ja jasnym chelom"

Show a transliteration: Default | DIN | GOST

Note on Transliterations

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Anonymous/Unidentified Artist) , title 1: "Over the steppe"


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2003-11-09
Line count: 16
Word count: 72

Over the steppe
Language: English  after the Russian (Русский) 
The dreary steppe where I'm journeying 
Never a flower to be seen; 
Never a tree where the nightingale 
Sings in a bower of green. 

Gloomy the night envelops me 
Never a star shines above. 
What called you back to my memory 
Suddenly, swiftly, my love! 

Clear as the day, my beloved one,
Rises before me your face;
Vision of gladness that instantly
Lights up the dark, boundless space.

Now, hear the song of the nightingale
Break from the thicket near by,
Now all the desert is blooming,
Myriad of stars gleam on high.

From a concert program from 1935.

Authorship

Based onBased on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Harry Joelson

This text was added to the website: 2012-04-04
Line count: 16
Word count: 93