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Six Hölderlin fragments

Word count: 472

Song Cycle by (Edward) Benjamin Britten (1913 - 1976)

Original language: Sechs Hölderlin-Fragmente

1. The approval of others

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
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Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich Hölderlin (1770 - 1843), "Menschenbeifall" CAT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Benjamin Britten, Paul von Klenau, Ernst-Lothar von Knorr. Go to the text.

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Is my heart not sacred, full of finer life,
now that I love? Why did you regard me more
when I was prouder and more truculent,
when I was more wordy and more vain?

Ah, only what is good for the marketplace can please people;
the servant respects only an oppressive master.
To believe in the divine
one must be divine in one's own right.


Translation of title "Menschenbeifall" = "The approval of others"

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

2. Home

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

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Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich Hölderlin (1770 - 1843), "Die Heimat" CAT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Benjamin Britten, Hanns Eisler, Josef Matthias Hauer. Go to the text.

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 The boatman turns homeward on the mute river
 from distant islands, where he has been gathering his harvest;
 gladly would I also turn toward home now;
 but what have I gathered except sorrow?
 
 You lovely banks that brought me up,
 can you still love's grief? ah, can you give me,
 when I come to you woods of my childhood,
 can you give me that peace once again?


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

3. Socrates and Alcibiades

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

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Based on

Go to the single-text view


"Why, holy Socrates, do you court
  This youth all the time? Don't you know of anything greater?
    Why do your eyes gaze on him with love,
      as if you were looking at the gods?"
 
He who has pondered the most profound thoughts, loves what is most alive;
  He who has seen the world understands lofty virtue.
    And in the end, the wise will often
      Bend toward that which is beautiful.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

4. The youth

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

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Based on

Go to the single-text view


When I was a boy
a god would often rescue me
from the screams and shouts of men;
there I would play, secure and good,
with the flowers of the grove,
and the breezes of the sky
would play with me.

And as you cheer the hearts
of plants
when toward you
they reach their tender arms,
so did you gladden my heart,
Father Helios!
and, like Endymion,
I was your beloved,
sacred Luna!

O all you constant,
amiable gods!
Would that you knew
how my soul loved you!

[ ... ]
But I knew you better than I ever knew any man; I understood the silence of the Ether, but the words of mankind I never understood. I was brought up by the pleasind sound of the rustling grove, and I learned to love beneath the flowers. In the arms of the gods I became a man.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

5. The middle of life

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
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Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich Hölderlin (1770 - 1843), "Hälfte des Lebens", appears in Gedichte 1800-1804, in Nachtgesänge CAT CZE FRE FRE IRI RUS
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Benjamin Britten, Friedrich Cerha, Harald Genzmer, Olivier Greif, Josef Matthias Hauer, Paavo Heininen, Philippe Hersant, Karl Horwitz, Gordon Kerry, Gideon Klein, René Leibowitz, Ernst Ludwig Leitner, György Ligeti, Josef Ivar Müller, Wilhelm Petersen, Hermann Reutter, Wolfgang Michael Rihm, Dmitri Nikolaevich Smirnov, Hans Uwe Strübing, Stefan Wolpe. Go to the text.

See other settings of this text.


With yellow pears
and full of wild roses,
the land hangs over the lake,
you fair swans,
and drunk with kisses
you dunk your heads
into the sacred, sober water.

Woe is me! where, when 
it is winter, will I get flowers, 
and where the sunshine,
and the shade of the earth?
The walls stand
mute and cold; in the wind
the weathervanes rattle.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

6. The lines of life

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich Hölderlin (1770 - 1843), no title CAT FRE FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Benjamin Britten, Friedrich Cerha, Paul Geilsdorf, Philippe Hersant, Wilhelm Killmayer, Thomas Schubert, Alessandro Solbiati. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


 The lines of life are varied,
 as are roads, and as are the boundaries of mountains.
 Whatever we are here, a god can complement there
 with harmony and perpetual reward and peace.


Translation of title "Die Linien des Lebens" = "The lines of life"

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

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