by Nikolaus Lenau (1802 - 1850)
Translation © by Emily Ezust

Schon zerfließt das ferne Gebirg mit...
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): ENG FRE ITA
Schon zerfließt das ferne Gebirg mit Wolken
In ein Meer; den Wogen entsteigt der Mond, er
Grüßt die Flur, entgegen ihm grüßt das schönste
Lied Philomelens.

Aus dem Blütenstrauche, der um das Plätzchen
Zarter Liebe heimlichend sich verschlinget:
Mirzi horcht am Busen des Jünglings ihrem 
Zaubergeflöte.

Dort am Hügel weiden die Schafe beider 
Traulichen Gemenges in einer Herde,
Ihre Glöcklein stimmen so lieblich ein zu 
Frohen Akkorden.

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Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Emily Ezust) , title 1: "Already the distant mountains are dissolving", copyright ©
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , title 1: "Image vespérale", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , title unknown, copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:38
Line count: 12
Word count: 67

Already the distant mountains are dissolving
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
Already the distant mountains are dissolving with the clouds
into a sea; out of the waves climbs the moon. She1
greets the meadow and on the other side, greets the most beautiful
song of Philomela2.

[It comes] from a bush whose blossoming branches wind round 
the secret spot of tender love.
Against the chest of the youth, Mirzi hearkens to their 
magic trills.

There by the hill the sheep of both graze 
harmoniously together in one flock;
their little bells join in so pleasingly
with merry accord.

View original text (without footnotes)
Translation revised 01-20-09 with very helpful suggestions by Bertram Kottmann.

1 In German, the moon is masculine
2 here, a metonym for nightingale (in Greek mythology, Philomela was transformed into a nightingale).

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- https://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.


Based on

 

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:38
Line count: 12
Word count: 87