Translation © by Charles Hopkins (1952 - 2007)

Chrysilla
Language: French (Français) 
Lorsque l'heure viendra de la coupe remplie,
Déesse, épargne-moi de voir à mon chevet
Le Temps tardif couper, sans pleurs et sans regret.
Le long fil importun d'une trop longue vie.

Arme plutôt l'Amour ; hélas ! il m'a haïe
Toujours et je sais trop que le cruel voudrait
Déjà que de mon cœur, à son suprême trait.
Coulât mon sang mortel sur la terre rougie.

Mais non ! que vers le soir en riant m'apparaisse.
[Silencieuse,]1 nue et belle, ma Jeunesse !
Qu'elle tienne une rose et l'effeuille dans l'eau ;

J'écouterai l'adieu pleuré par la fontaine
Et, sans qu'il soit besoin de flèches ni de faux.
Je fermerai les yeux pour la nuit souterraine.

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Sorabji.

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Chrysilla", written 2002, first published 2002, copyright © 2002, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Chrysilla", written c2005, copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Research team for this text: Guy Laffaille [Guest Editor] , Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2009-07-01
Line count: 14
Word count: 116

Chrysilla
Language: English  after the French (Français) 
When the time comes that my cup is full,
Goddess, spare me the sight
of Father Time at my bedside belatedly, and with neither tears nor regret,
cutting the tiresomely drawn out thread of a life too long.

Instead, arm Love; Alas! He has always despised me
and I know too well his cruelty in wishing
that from my heart, as its crowning achievement,
may already have flowed
my life’s blood on to the reddened earth.

But no! As I approach the evening of my life,
let my Youth, with its laughter, appear to me, quietly, naked and lovely!
May she hold a rose, whose petals she might pull off into the water;

I shall listen to the spring waters weeping their farewell
and, without there being any need for arrows or scythes,
I shall close my eyes for the subterranean night.

Confirmed with an original Microsoft Word Document provided by Alistair Hinton.


Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Another version of this text exists in the database.


Researcher for this text: Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2018-08-03
Line count: 15
Word count: 142