by Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561 - 1627)
Translation © by Laura Prichard

Iban al pinar
Language: Spanish (Español) 
Available translation(s): ENG FRE GER
Serranas de Cuenca
iban al pinar, 
unas por piñones, 
otras por bailar. 

Bailando y partiendo 
las serranas bellas,
un piñón con otro, 
[si ya no es con perlas]1
de amor las saetas 
huelgan de trocar: 
unas por piñones, 
otras por bailar, 

Entre rama y rama 
cuando el ciego dios 
pide al Sol los ojos 
por verlas mejor, 
los ojos del Sol 
las veréis pisar, 
unas por piñones, 
otras por bailar.

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Granados.

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Laura Prichard) , "Going to the pine forest", copyright © 2020, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Jean Laurent) , "Dans la pinède", copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , "In den Pinienhain", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 20
Word count: 70

Going to the pine forest
Language: English  after the Spanish (Español) 
The local girls from Cuenca
are going to the pine forest, 
some go for pine boughs, 
others for dancing. 

Dancing and parrying,
those beautiful girls,
one pine bough against another, 
if they can’t have pearls
strike like Cupid’s arrows
and take a break from gathering: 
some go for pine boughs, 
others for dancing, 

Among all the branches,
the blind god
asks the Sun for eyes
to see them better, 
[with] the eyes of the Sun 
you’ll see them walking, 
some go for pine boughs, 
others for dancing.

Notes
Stanza 1, line 1 - "Serrana" - a woman from the 'sierra' or mountain range.
Stanza 1, line 1 - "Cuenca" - The medieval town Cuenca is situated romantically on the rocky spur of S Cristóbal and cut off from the Serranía de Cuenca by the deep defiles of the Júcar and the Huecar - both rivers are overhung by the old walls and towers of the town.
Stanza 3, line 2 - "the blind god" - i.e., Cupid.


Authorship

  • Translation from Spanish (Español) to English copyright © 2020 by Laura Prichard, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.
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Based on

 

This text was added to the website: 2020-02-29
Line count: 20
Word count: 87