by Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)
Translation by Stéphane Mallarmé (1842 - 1898)

Hear the loud alarum bells
Language: English 
Hear the loud alarum bells --
Brazen bells!
What [a]1 tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells!
In the startled ear of night
How they scream out their affright!
Too much horrified to speak,
They can only shriek, shriek,
Out of tune,
In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire,
In a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire,
Leaping higher, higher, higher,
With a desperate desire,
And a resolute endeavor,
Now -- now to sit or never,
By the side of the pale-faced moon.
Oh, the bells, bells, bells!
What a tale their terror tells
Of Despair!
How they clang, and clash, and roar!
What a horror they outpour
On the bosom of the palpitating air!
[Yet the]2 ear it fully knows,
By the twanging,
And the clanging,
How the danger ebbs and flows:
Yet the ear distinctly tells,
In the jangling,
And the wrangling,
How the danger sinks and swells,
By the sinking or the swelling in the anger of the bells --
Of the bells --
Of the bells, bells, bells, bells,
Bells, bells, bells --
In the clamor and the clangor of the bells!

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Hall.
2 Hall: "Yes, the"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


This text (or a part of it) is used in a work

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2007-12-14
Line count: 34
Word count: 186

Entendez les bruyantes cloches d'alarme
Language: French (Français)  after the English 
Entendez les bruyantes cloches d'alarme -- 
cloches de bronze ! 
Quelle histoire de terreur dit maintenant leur turbulence ! 
Dans l'oreille saisie de la nuit 
comme elle crie leur effroi, 
trop terrifiées pour parler, 
elles peuvent seulement s'écrier 
hors de ton, 
dans une clameur d'appel à merci du feu, 
dans une remontrance au feu sourd et frénétique 
bondissant plus haut (plus haut, plus haut), 
avec un désespéré désir 
ou une recherché résolue, 
maintenant, de maintenant siéger, ou jamais, 
aux côtés de la lune à la face pâle. 
Oh ! Les cloches (cloches, cloches), 
quelle histoire dit leur terreur -- 
de Désespoir ! 
Qu'elles frappent et choquent, et rugissent ! 
Quelle horreur elles versent 
sur le sein de l'air palpitant ! 
Encore l'ouïe sait-elle, pleinement, 
par le tintouin 
et le vacarme, 
comment tourbillonne et s'épanche le danger; 
encore l'ouïe dit-elle, distinctement, 
dans le vacarme 
et la querelle, 
comment s'abat ou s'enfle le danger, 
à l'abattement ou à l'enflure dans la colère des cloche, 



dans la clameur et l'éclat des cloches !

About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Guy Laffaille [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2011-01-06
Line count: 31
Word count: 168