Tolv Folkeviser og Melodier fra fremmede Lande

Song Cycle by Agathe Ursula Backer-Grøndahl (1847 - 1907)

Word count: 518

1. Minnelied [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

2. Wiegenlied [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

3. Ha, belle Blonde [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

4. Chanson Béarnaise [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

5. 'T Carillon van Duynkerke [sung text not yet checked]

Een kalemanden rok,
Een wit mantlyntje d'rop.
En weet ye waer da'k weunen ?
Al in Sint Gillis dorp.
Een lynwaden kazakje,
Een biezeboomen rok;
En zou 'k daermeê niet lachen ?
De fruytpan op zyn kop.

Authorship

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. Lasta tundittaessa [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

7. Vaagn, du min søde Kjærlighed [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

8. The lily of the vale [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

9. Bonnie laddie [sung text not yet checked]

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

10. Auld Lang Syne [sung text not yet checked]

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
 And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
 And [auld]1 lang syne!
Chorus:
 For auld lang syne, my [jo]2,
   For auld lang syne,
 We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
   For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
 And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
 For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
 And pa'd3 the gowans fine;
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot4,
 Sin' auld lang syne.

We taw hae paidl'd in the burn,
 Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar'd,
 Sin auld lang syne.

And there 's a hand, my trusty fiere!
 And gie 's a hand o' thine!
And we'll take a right gude-willie-waught,
 For auld lang syne.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Beethoven: "days o' "
2 Beethoven (and some other versions of Burns): "dear"
3 Some other versions of Burns: "pou'd"
4 Some other versions of Burns: "fit"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

11. Ae fond kiss [sung text not yet checked]

Ae fond kiss, and then we sever!
Ae fareweel, and then for ever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee.
Who shall say that Fortune grieves him,
While the star of hope she leaves him?
Me, nae chearful twinkle lights me;
Dark despair around benights me.

I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy:
Naething could resist my Nancy!
But to see her, was to love her,
Love but her, and love for ever.
Had we never lov'd sae kindly,
Had we never lov'd sae blindly,
Never met - or never parted-
We had ne'er been broken-hearted.-

Fare-thee-weel, thou first and fairest!
Fare-thee-weel, thou best and dearest!
Thine be ilka joy and treasure,
Peace, Enjoyment, Love and Pleasure!
Ae fond kiss, and then we sever!
Ae fareweel, alas, for ever!
Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,
Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Josef Václav Sládek) , "Ještě jedno políbení"
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , "Un tendre baiser et nous nous séparons", copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Confirmed with The Complete Poetical Works of Robert Burns, Cambridge edition, Boston and New York, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1897, page 163.


Researcher for this text: Pierre Mathé [Guest Editor]

12. Afton Water [sung text not yet checked]

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes,
Flow gently, I'll sing thee a song in thy praise;
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

Thou stock dove whose echo resounds thro' the glen,
Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den,
Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear,
I charge you disturb not my slumbering Fair.

How lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills, 
Far marked with the courses of [clear]1, winding rills; 
There daily I wander as noon rises high, 
My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye. 

How pleasant thy banks and green valleys below, 
Where, wild in the woodlands, the primroses blow; 
There oft, as mild ev'ning weeps over the lea, 
The sweet-scented birk shades my Mary and me.

Thy crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides,
And winds by the cot where my Mary resides;
How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave,
As, gathering sweet flowerets, she stems thy clear wave.

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes,
Flow gently, sweet River, the theme of my lays;
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream,
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Hopekirk: "sweet"

Research team for this text: Jean Branch , Garrett Medlock [Guest Editor]