by Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906)
Translation by William Archer (1856 - 1924) and by Mary Morrison

Bergkongen red sig under ø;
Language: Norwegian (Bokmål) 
Available translation(s): FRE
Bergkongen red sig under ø;
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
Vilde han fæste den væne mø. 
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Bergkongen red til herr Håkons gård; 
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
Liden Kirsten stod ude, slog ud sit hår.
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Bergkongen fæsted den væne viv; 
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
Han spændte en sølvgjord omkring hendes liv.
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Bergkongen fæsted den liljevånd
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
Med femten guldringe til hver hendes hånd.
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Tre sommere gik, og der gik vel fem; 
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage -- 
Kirsten sad i berget i alle dem. 
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Fem sommere gik, og der gik vel ni;
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
Liden Kirsten så ikke solen i li.
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

Dalen har blomster og fuglesang;
  -- Så klagelig rinde mine dage --
I berget er der guld og en nat så lang.
  -- Ret aldrig du kommer tilbage --

About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Emma Klingenfeld (1846 - 1935) [an adaptation] ENG FRE FRE ; composed by Carl Bohm, Hugo Wolf.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist , from Das Fest auf Solhaug ENG FRE ; composed by Paul Juon.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (William Archer) (Mary Morrison) , appears in The Feast at Solhoug, first published 1907
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , "Le roi de la montagne chevauchait sur l'île", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website: 2010-10-25 00:00:00
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:03:03
Line count: 28
Word count: 163

The Hill‑King to the sea did ride
Language: English  after the Norwegian (Bokmål) 
The Hill-King to the sea did ride;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
To woo a maiden to be his bride.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

The Hill-King rode to Sir Hakon's hold;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
Little Kirsten sat combing her locks of gold.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

The Hill-King wedded the maiden fair;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
A silvern girdle she ever must wear.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

The Hill-King wedded the lily-wand,
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
With fifteen gold rings on either hand.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

Three summers passed, and there passed full five;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
In the hill little Kirsten was buried alive.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

Five summers passed, and there passed full nine;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
Little Kirsten ne'er saw the glad sunshine.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

In the dale there are flowers and the birds' blithe song;
   -- Oh, sad are my days and dreary --
In the hill there is gold and the night is long.
   -- I am waiting for thee, I am weary. --

About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website: 2010-10-25 00:00:00
Last modified: 2014-11-25 11:15:24
Line count: 28
Word count: 213