by Robert Burns (1759 - 1796)
Translation by Josef Václav Sládek (1845 - 1912)

Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon
Language: Scottish (Scots) 
Available translation(s): FRE IRI
Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon,
  How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair;
How can ye [chant]1, ye little birds,
  And I sae weary, fu' o' care!
Thou'lt break my heart, thou warbling bird,
  That [wantons]2 thro' the [flowering]3 thorn: 
Thou minds me o' departed joys,
  Departed -- never to return!

[Aft]4 hae I rov'd by bonnie Doon,
  To see the rose and woodbine twine;
And ilka bird sang o' its [luve]5,
  And fondly sae did I o' mine.
Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose,
  Fu' sweet upon its thorny tree;
[And my fause luver]6 [stole the]7 rose,
  [But, ah! he]8 left the thorn wi' me.

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing His Poems, Songs and Correspondence. With a New Life of the Poet, and Notices, Critical and Biographical, by Allan Cunningham. Elegantly illustrated, Boston: Phillips, Sampson, and Company, 1859, page 257.

1 Grainger, Quilter: "chaunt"
2 Grainger: "warbles"
3 Quilter: "flower"; Grainger: "flow'ring"
4 Quilter: "Oft"
5 Quilter: "love"
6 Grainger, Quilter: "But my fause lover"
7 Grainger: "staw my"
8 Quilter: "And oh, he"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Set in a modified version by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach, Maurice Ravel.

Set in a modified version by David Arditti.

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Wilhelm Christoph Leonhard Gerhard (1780 - 1858) , "Am Ufer des Doon", page 191, poem No. 108, first published 1840 ; composed by Robert Franz, Moritz Hauptmann, Hubert Ferdinand Kufferath.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Hans Gál (1890 - 1987) , "Du liebe Flur im Seengrund", copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission ; composed by Hans Gál.
  • Also set in Scottish (Scots), [adaptation] ; composed by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach, Maurice Ravel.
  • Also set in Scottish (Scots), [adaptation] ; composed by Hans Gál.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Josef Václav Sládek) , "Břehy Doonu"
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • IRI Irish (Gaelic) [singable] (Gabriel Rosenstock) , copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: John Versmoren

This text was added to the website: 2004-07-11
Line count: 16
Word count: 108

Břehy Doonu
Language: Czech (Čeština)  after the Scottish (Scots) 
Vy břehy, lesy na Doonu,
   jak můžete tak krásné kvést,
jak zpívati, vy ptáčata,
   když mně tak smutno, smutno jest!
Mně srdce zlomíš, ptačátko,
   v tom květném hlohu zpívajíc,
těch blahých dnů mi vzpomínáš,
   jež nevrátí se nikdy víc.

Já bloudila jsem u Doonu,
   kde réva růži objala
a každý pták o lásce pěl
   a já si o své zpívala.
Já růži s trnem utrhla
   tak vesele, tak bezděky, —
hoch nevěrný mi růži vzal
   a trn mi zůstal na věky.

Confirmed with BURNS, Robert. Výbor z písní a ballad, translated by Josef Václav Sládek, Praha: J. Otto, 1892.


Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Andrew Schneider [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2019-08-11
Line count: 16
Word count: 81