by Alfred Tennyson, Lord (1809 - 1892)
Translation by H. A. Feldmann

And in those days she made a little song
Language: English 
Available translation(s): DUT FRI
[And in those days she made a little song,
And called her song "The Song of Love and Death,"
And sang it: sweetly could she make and sing.]1

 Sweet is true love tho' giv'n in vain, in vain;
 And sweet is death that puts an end to pain:
 I know not which is sweeter, no, not I.

 Love, art thou sweet? then bitter death must be:
 Love, thou art bitter; sweet is death to me.
 O Love, if death [be]2 sweeter, let me die.

 Sweet love, that seems not made to fade away,
 Sweet death, that seems to make us loveless clay,
 I know not which is sweeter, no, not I.

 I fain would follow love, if that could be;
 I needs must follow death, who calls for me;
 Call and I follow, I follow! let me die.

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Most of the settings use the song itself; Musical Settings of Early and Mid-Victorian Literature implies that Papini and Mrs. Phillips both use this stanza as well in their settings.
2 Walthew: "is"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) (Geart van der Meer) , copyright © 2013, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRI Frisian (Geart van der Meer) , copyright © 2013, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Peter Brixius

Text added to the website: 2009-01-07 00:00:00
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:17
Line count: 15
Word count: 138

Sie dachte selbst ein kleines Lied sich...
Language: German (Deutsch)  after the English 
[Sie dachte selbst ein kleines Lied sich aus,
Und sang's: es hieß das Lied von Lieb' und Tod;
Sie reimte lieblich, wie sie lieblich sang.]1

Süß ist's, zu lieben, wenn auch ungeliebt;
Süß ist der Tod, der uns Erlösung giebt;
Weiß nicht, ob Liebe süßer, oder Tod.

Wenn Liebe Glück, muß Sterben bittre Pein,
Wenn Liebe Leid, muß Sterben Wonne sein;
Ich sterbe gern, dann endet meine Noth.

O Glück der Liebe, das uns ewig scheint,
O milder Tod, der kaltem Staub uns eint!
Weiß nicht, ob Liebe süßer oder Tod.

Ich folgte gern der Liebe, könnt' es sein,
Doch muß ich in den Tod; schon harrt er mein;
Laßt sterben mich, dann endet meine Noth.

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Klose; further changes may exist not noted above.

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

  • by Friedrich Klose (1862 - 1942), "Das Lied der Maid von Astolat", op. 1 ([Zwei] Lieder und Gesänge für 1 Singstimme mit Pianofortebleitung) no. 1, published 1887 [voice and piano], Berlin, Luckhardt [
     text not verified 
    ]

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website: 2013-05-30 00:00:00
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:05:12
Line count: 15
Word count: 116