Translation by Adam Storck (1780 - 1822)

Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er
Language: English  after the English 
Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er,
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking;
Dream of battled fields no more,
Days of danger, nights of waking.

In our isle's enchanted hall,
Hands unseen thy couch are strewing,
Fairy strains of music fall,
Every sense in slumber dewing.

In our isle's enchanted hall,
Hands unseen thy couch are strewing,
Fairy strains of music fall,
Every sense in slumber dewing.

Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er,
Dream of fighting fields no more;
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking,
Morn of toil, nor night of waking.

No rude sound shall reach thine ear,
Armour's clang, or war-steed champing,
Trump nor pibroch summon here
Mustering clan, or squadron tramping.

Ruder sounds shall none be near,
Guards nor warders challenge here,
Here's no war-steed's neigh and champing,
Shouting clans, or squadrons stamping.

Yet the lark's shrill fife may come
At the day-break from the fallow,
And the bittern sound his drum,
Booming from the sedgy shallow.

Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er,
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking:
Dream of battled fields no more,
Days of danger, nights of waking.

About the headline (FAQ)

Note: This is the English text used by Schubert for Ellen's Song I in parallel with the German text. It has eight stanzas, where stanza 3 is a repetition of stanza 2 (while the German counterpart needs two different stanzas), and stanzas 6 and 7 are interchanged compared with Scott's original text. Finally, stanza 8 is a second repetition of stanza 1 (Scott's text repeats this stanza only once).


The text shown is a variant of another text.
It is based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:


Researcher for this text: Peter Rastl [Guest Editor]

Text added to the website: 2017-10-21 00:00:00
Last modified: 2017-10-22 09:33:46
Line count: 32
Word count: 183

Raste Krieger! Krieg ist aus
Language: German (Deutsch)  after the English 
Available translation(s): CAT DUT ENG FRE ITA
Raste Krieger! Krieg ist aus,
Schlaf den Schlaf, nichts wird dich wecken,
Träume nicht von wildem Strauß,
[Nicht]1 von Tag und Nacht voll Schrecken. 

In der Insel Zauberhallen
Wird ein weicher Schlafgesang
Um das müde Haupt dir wallen
Zu der Zauberharfe Klang. 

Feen mit [unsichtbarn]2 Händen
Werden auf dein Lager hin
Holde Schlummerblumen senden,
Die im Zauberlande blühn. 

Raste Krieger, Krieg ist aus,
Schlaf den Schlaf, nichts wird dich wecken,
Träume nicht [vom wilden]3 Strauß,
Nicht von Tag und Nacht voll Schrecken. 

Nicht der Trommel wildes Rasen,
Nicht des Kriegs [gebietend Wort]4,
Nicht der Todeshörner Blasen
Scheuchen deinen Schlummer fort. 

Nicht das Stampfen wilder Pferde,
Nicht der Schreckensruf der Wacht,
Nicht das Bild von Tagsbeschwerde
Stören deine stille Nacht. 

Doch der Lerche Morgensänge
Wecken sanft dein schlummernd Ohr,
Und des Sumpfgefieders Klänge
Steigend aus Geschilf und Rohr. 

Raste Krieger! Krieg ist aus,
Schlaf den Schlaf, nichts wird dich wecken,
Träume nicht [vom wilden]3 Strauß,
Nicht von Tag und Nacht voll Schrecken.

F. Mendelssohn Bartholdy sets stanzas 1-3

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Das Fräulein vom See. Ein Gedicht in sechs Gesängen von Walter Scott. Aus dem Englischen, und mit einer historischen Einleitung und Anmerkungen von D. Adam Storck, weiland Professor in Bremen. Zweite, vom Uebersetzer selbst noch verbesserte Auflage. Essen, bei G. D. Bädeker. 1823, pages 33-34; and with Das Fräulein vom See. Ein Gedicht in sechs Gesängen von Walter Scott. Aus dem Englischen, und mit einer historischen Einleitung und Anmerkungen von D. Adam Storck, Professor in Bremen. Essen, bei G. D. Bädeker. 1819, pages 35-37.

1 Mendelssohn: "Nichts"
2 Schubert, Mendelssohn: "unsichtbaren"
3 Schubert: "von wildem" (as in line 3)
4 Storck (1819 edition): "Commandowort"

Authorship

Based onBased on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CAT Catalan (Català) (Salvador Pila) , subtitle: "El cant d'Ellen I", copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) [singable] (Lau Kanen) , "Ellens gezang I", copyright © 2006, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Sharon Krebs) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Canzone di Ellen I", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Research team for this text: Richard Morris , Peter Rastl [Guest Editor]

Text added to the website: 2003-11-07 00:00:00
Last modified: 2018-08-07 07:25:50
Line count: 32
Word count: 161