by Paul Verlaine (1844 - 1896)
Translation by Bergen Weeks Applegate (b. 1865)

Crépuscule du soir mystique
Language: French (Français) 
Available translation(s): GER
Le Souvenir avec le Crépuscule
Rougeoie et tremble à l'ardent horizon
De l'Espérance en flamme qui recule
Et s'agrandit ainsi qu'une cloison
Mystérieuse où mainte floraison
— Dahlia, lys, [tulipe]1 et renoncule —
S'élance autour d'un treillis, et circule
Parmi la maladive exhalaison
De parfums lourds et chauds, dont le poison
— Dahlia, lys, tulipe et renoncule —
Noyant mes sens, mon âme et ma raison,
Mêle dans une immense pâmoison
Le Souvenir avec le Crépuscule.

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Paul Verlaine, Poëmes saturniens, Paris: Alphonse Lemerre, 1866, in Paysages tristes, pages 49-50. Note: The historical spelling variant "pamoison" as appears in the 1866 publication has been changed to "pâmoison".

1 omitted by K. Sorabji.

Authorship:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Mystical Evening Twilight", written 2002, copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Mystical Twilight", written c2005, copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Bergen Weeks Applegate) , "Twilight of Mystic Eve", appears in Poems Saturnine, in 3. Somber Landscapes, no. 2
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Pierre Mathé) , "Mystische Abenddämmerung", copyright © 2013, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 13
Word count: 76

Twilight of Mystic Eve
Language: English  after the French (Français) 
Memory, here with the Twilight
Reddens and trembles on the distant rim
Of ardent sky, where Hope glows like a bright
Enduring flame, that, wavering and slim,
Draws back and then expands like some far dim
Mysterious garden; where flower on flower
— Dahlia, lily, tulip and buttercup —
Grow rank upon a trellis, blooming hour by hour
In flaming rings; where noxious mists exude
A perfume strong and warm, whose poison
— Dahlia, lily, tulip and buttercup —
Drowning my soul, my senses, and my reason,
Unites, in one vast lassitude,
Memory here with the Twilight.

Confirmed with Bergen Applegate, Paul Verlaine: His Absinthe-Tinted Song, Chicago, Ralph Fletcher Seymour, The Alderbrink Press, 1916, page 54.


Authorship:

Based on:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2022-02-27
Line count: 14
Word count: 97