Songs of Shelley

by Granville Ransome Bantock, Sir (1868 - 1946)

1. Ozymandias [sung text not yet checked]

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast [and]1 trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive (stamped on these lifeless things,)
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"[My name is]2 Ozimandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing besides remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

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Confirmed with The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume 2, London, George Bell & Sons, 1892, page 294.

1 omitted by Manno.
2 Manno: "I am"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. When passion's trance [sung text not yet checked]

When passion's trance is overpast,
If tenderness and truth could last,
Or live, whilst all wild feelings keep
Some mortal slumber, dark and deep,
I should not weep, I should not weep! 

It were enough to feel, to see,
Thy soft eyes gazing tenderly,
And dream the rest--and burn and be
The secret food of fires unseen,
Couldst thou but be as thou hast been,  

After the slumber of the year
The woodland violets reappear;
All things revive in field or grove,
And sky and sea, but two, which move
And form all others, life and love. 

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Vrchlický) , "Sloky", Prague, J. Otto, first published 1901

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. A widow bird [sung text not yet checked]

A widow bird sate mourning for her love
  Upon a wintry bough,
The frozen wind crept on above;
  The freezing stream below.

There was no leaf upon the forest bare,
  No [flower]1 upon the ground
And little motion in the air,
  Except the mill-wheel's sound.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Vrchlický) , "Píseň"
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Un passero solitario il suo amore lamenta", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

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Some settings use the modernized spelling "sat" instead of "sate"
1 Treharne: "flowers".

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. As the moon's soft splendor [sung text not yet checked]

As the moon's soft splendor 
O'er the faint, cold starlight of heaven
  Is thrown,
So thy voice most tender
To the strings without soul has given
  Its own.

The stars will awaken,
Though the moon sleep a full hour later
  Tonight: 
No leaf will be shaken
Whilst the dews of thy melody scatter
  Delight.

Though the sound overpowers,
Sing again, with thy sweet voice revealing
  A tone 
Of some world far from ours,
Where music and moonlight and feeling
  Are one.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Vrchlický) , title 1: "Arie pro hudbu", title 2: "Paní, jež zpívala při průvodu kytary", Prague, J. Otto, first published 1901

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. Hymn of Pan [sung text not yet checked]

From the forests and highlands
We come, we come;
From the river-girt islands,
Where loud waves are dumb
Listening to my sweet pipings.
The wind in the reeds and the rushes,
The bees on the bells of thyme,
The birds on the myrtle bushes,
The cicale above in the lime,
And the lizards below in the grass, 
Were as silent as ever old Tmolus was,
Listening to my sweet pipings.

Liquid Peneus was flowing,
And all dark Tempe lay
In Pelion's shadow, outgrowing
The light of the dying day,
Speeded by my sweet pipings.
The Sileni, and Sylvans, and Fauns,
And the Nymphs of the woods and the waves,
To the edge of the moist river-lawns, 
And the brink of the dewy caves,
And all that did then attend and follow,
Were silent with love, as you now, Apollo,
With envy of my sweet pipings.

I sang of the dancing stars, 
I sang of the daedal Earth,
And of Heaven--and the giant wars,
And Love, and Death, and Birth, --
And then I changed my pipings, --
Singing how down the vale of Maenalus 
I pursued a maiden and clasped a reed.
Gods and men, we are all deluded thus!
It breaks in our bosom and then we bleed:
All wept, as I think both ye now would,
If envy or age had not frozen your blood, 
At the sorrow of my sweet pipings.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Vrchlický) , "Hymna Panova", Prague, J. Otto, first published 1901

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]
Total word count: 566