5 Sonnette von William Shakespeare

Song Cycle by Adolf Wallnöfer (1854 - 1946)

Word count: 1067

1. Sonet 21 [sung text not yet checked]

So is it not with me as with that Muse,
Stirred by a painted beauty to his verse,
Who heaven itself for ornament doth use
And every fair with his fair doth rehearse,
Making a couplement of proud compare
With sun and moon, with earth and sea's rich gems,
With April's first-born flowers, and all things rare,
That heaven's air in this huge rondure hems.
O! let me, true in love, but truly write,
And then believe me, my love is as fair
As any mother's child, though not so bright
As those gold candles fixed in heaven's air:
  Let them say more that like of hearsay well;
  I will not praise that purpose not to sell.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

1. Wohl gleicht nicht meine Muse jenem Lied[sung text not yet checked]

Wohl gleicht nicht meine Muse jenem Lied,
Das an geschminkter Schönheit sich begeistert,
Den Himmel selbst als Schmuck herniederzieht,
Und bildlich alles Schönen sich bemeistert
In Anhäufungen prunkender Vergleiche
Mit Sonn' und Mond, der blühenden Lenzesflur,
Kleinodien aus dem Erd' und Wasserreiche,
Und allen Seltenheiten der Natur.
Wahr wie mein Lieben sei auch mein Gedicht:
Drum glaub' mir, meine Liebe ist so schön,
Den Schönsten gleich -- wenn auch so strahlend nicht
Wie jene goldnen Stern' in Himmelshöhn.
  Mehr sage wer nach Hörensagen liebt;
  Mein Lied rühmt nicht was es nicht käuflich giebt.

Authorship

Based on

Go to the single-text view

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Passionate Pilgrim. VIII [sung text not yet checked]

If music and sweet poetry agree,
As they must needs, the sister and the brother,
Then must the love be great 'twixt thee and me,
Because thou lovest the one, and I the other.
Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch
Upon the lute doth ravish human sense;
Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such
As, passing all conceit, needs no defence.
Thou lovest to hear the sweet melodious sound
That Phoebus' lute, the queen of music, makes;
And I in deep delight am chiefly drown'd
When as himself to singing he betakes.
  One god is god of both, as poets feign;
  One knight loves both, and both in thee remain.

Authorship

Go to the single-text view

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Passionate Pilgrim. VIII [sung text checked 1 time]

Wenn sich Musik und Poesie verbinden,
Geschwisterlich, in süßer Harmonie,
Muß sich Dein Herz zu meinem Herzen finden:
Du liebst Musik, ich liebe Poesie.
Du liebst es Dowland's hehrem Spiel zu lauschen,
Deß Lautenklang das Herz mit Zauber füllt --
Ich lieb' es, mich an Spenser zu berauschen,
Deß Lied die tiefste Weisheit mir enthüllt;
Du liebst des Gottes weihevolle Klänge
Die Dich empor zu höhern Sphären tragen --
Ich liebe seine himmlischen Gesänge,
Die was ich selbst nicht sagen kann, mir sagen.
  Ein Gott schuf beide! Wie sie sich verbinden,
  Muß sich Dein Herz zu meinem Herzen finden! 

Authorship

Based on

Go to the single-text view

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Sonet 75 [sung text not yet checked]

So are you to my thoughts as food to life,
Or as sweet-season'd showers are to the ground;
And for the peace of you I hold such strife
As 'twixt a miser and his wealth is found.
Now proud as an enjoyer, and anon
Doubting the filching age will steal his treasure;
Now counting best to be with you alone,
Then better'd that the world may see my pleasure:
Sometime all full with feasting on your sight,
And by and by clean starved for a look;
Possessing or pursuing no delight,
Save what is had, or must from you be took.
      Thus do I pine and surfeit day by day,
      Or gluttoning on all, or all away.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Sonet 75 [sung text not yet checked]

Wie Brot dem Leben, bist Du den Gedanken,
Wie Wolken die den Boten labend netzen,
Um Deine Ruh' ist in mir Kampf und Schwanken
Wie zwischen Geizigen und ihren Schätzen.
Jetzt jubl' ich im Bewußtsein daß Du mein,
Dann fürcht' ich, daß die Welt Dich mir entrückt;
Bald wär' ich lieber ganz mit Dir allein,
Bald wünsch' ich, Jeder säh' was mich entzückt.
Bald weilt mein Aug', gesättigt Dich betrachtend,
Und bald um einen Blick von Dir verschmachtend,
Denn Nichts ist meine Lust und mein Begehren
Als was Du mir, Geliebte, kannst gewähren.
  So bin ich, Höll' und Himmel wechselnd täglich,
  Bald überglücklich, bald elend unsäglich.

Authorship

Based on

See other settings of this text.

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Sonet 76 [sung text not yet checked]

Why is my verse so barren of new pride,
So far from variation or quick change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new-found methods and to compounds strange?
Why write I still all one, ever the same,
And keep invention in a noted weed,
That every word doth almost tell my name,
Showing their birth and where they did proceed?
O, know, sweet love, I always write of you,
And you and love are still my argument;
So all my best is dressing old words new,
Spending again what is already spent:
  For as the sun is daily new and old,
  So is my love still telling what is told.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (François-Victor Hugo) , no title, appears in Sonnets de Shakespeare, no. 76, first published 1857
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Perché il mio verso è spoglio di ogni nuovo ornamento", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Sonet 76 [sung text not yet checked]

Was ist so arm an Neuheit mein Gedicht,
Statt wechselnd nach der Mode sich zu schmücken?
Warum versuch' ich's wie die Andern nicht,
Prunkvoll, gespreizt und neu mich auszudrücken?
Warum trägt mein Gedanke immerfort
Ein und dasselbe Kleid, schlicht und gewohnlich,
Daß ich leicht kennbar bin, fast jedes Wort
Auf seinen Ursprung zeigt, auf mich persönlich?
O wisse, süße Liebe, immer sing' ich
Von Dir allein, Du meines Liedes Leben! 
Mein Bestes neu in alte Worte bring' ich,
Stets wiedergebend, was schon längst gegeben.
  Denn wie der Sonne Auf- und Untergang:
  Alt und doch täglich neu ist mein Gesang.

Authorship

Based on

Go to the single-text view

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Sonet 94 [sung text not yet checked]

They that have power to hurt, and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow;
They rightly do inherit heaven's graces,
And husband nature's riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others, but stewards of their excellence.
The summer's flower is to the summer sweet,
Though to itself, it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
      For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
      Lilies that fester, smell far worse than weeds.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Sonet 94 [sung text not yet checked]

Wer Macht zu schaden hat und es nicht thut,
Wer die Gewalt hat, doch ihr Wirken hemmt,
Wer, Andre rührend, selbst beherrscht sein Blut,
Kalt wie ein Stein bleibt, der Versuchung fremd:
Der ist des Himmels Liebling, und mit Recht,
Der zeigt den weisen Haushalt der Natur,
Wie sein Gesicht beherrscht er sein Geschlecht,
Die Andern dienen seiner Hoheit nur.
Des Sommers Blume ist des Sommers Zier,
Ob sie auch blüht und welkt für sich allein;
Doch, wenn sich Fäulniß offenbart in ihr,
Wird uns das ärmste Unkraut lieber sein:
  Denn nicht so grell verkehrt sich Duft und Wesen
  Bei Unkraut, als bei Lilien die verwesen.

Authorship

Based on

Go to the single-text view

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]