by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

From fairest creatures we desire...
Language: English 
Available translation(s): ITA
From fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory:
But thou contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thy self thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel:
Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament,
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content,
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding:
  Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
  To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.

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Authorship:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in French (Français), a translation by Pierre Jean Jouve (1887 - 1976) , copyright © GER ITA ; composed by Serge Baudo.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist FRE FRE ITA ; composed by Paul Coenen.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Karl Joseph Simrock (1802 - 1876) FRE FRE ITA ; composed by Carl Joachim Ludwig.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Franz Alfons Wolpert (1917 - 1978) FRE FRE ITA ; composed by Franz Alfons Wolpert.
  • Also set in Serbian (Српски), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist FRE FRE GER ITA ; composed by Tugomir Vidanović.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2007-10-07
Line count: 14
Word count: 106