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Poem of love

Word count: 1679

Song Cycle by Louis Vierne (1870 - 1937)

Original language: Le poème de l'amour

1. The day when I saw you

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 1. Floréal, no. 2, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): César Antonovich Cui, Gabriel Dupont, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


The day when I saw you for the first time,
You had an air that was sad and gay: in your voice
Captive nightingales wept, blackbirds whistled;
Your laughing mouth, where pearls formed like flowers,
Kept imperceptible creases at its two corners;
Your large blue eyes seemed like chalices filled
With the storm and drying the tears of rain
In the April breeze that sings and wipes them;
And shadows passed across your rosy brow
Like a black butterfly in a ray of sunlight.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

2. In the garden of my heart

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Au jardin de mon cœur", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 1. Floréal, no. 16, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Auguste Chapuis, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


When your loving eyes are not being morose,
My heart is a garden full of carnations and roses.

All is joyful: the flowers, the colours, the smells,
The bees buzzing, the butterflies flitting.

The sparrows, the chaffinches, the linnets, the tits,
All the intoxicated birds are singing like angels.

The fountain, which gurgles as sweet as honey,
Seems like an iris whose flower is a rainbow.

When, madam, Your Majesty is satisfied,
In the garden of my heart the whole world celebrates.

But when your eyes become cruel and displeased,
Farewell, flowers and birds! Farewell, springtime!

The roses, the carnations wilt on their stems.
No bee, no butterfly alights there.

Tits and sparrows, and linnets and chaffinches
Fly away far from me to sing their songs.

Removing its rainbow as one removes a mask,
The hoarse and heavy fountain sobs in its basin.

As long as I have not seen your softened glances,
My heart is a garden all planted up with troubles.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

3. The pink boat

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Le bateau rose", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 1. Floréal, no. 31, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Auguste Chapuis, Ange Flégier, Ernest Garnier, Lucien Hillemacher, Paul Hillemacher, Georges Adolphe Hüe, Paul-Jean-Jacques Lacome d'Estalenx, André Messager, Jeanne Rivet, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


I shall embark, if you so wish,
Like a merry sailor leaving shore
On the golden waves of your hair,
Towards a flowering paradise of dreams.

Your skirt, floating in the evening wind,
Will billow its folds like sails,
And when darkness falls over the sea
Your large eyes will be my two stars.

Your laughter, bursting out in a vermillion peal,
Will be the lantern on the main-top.
I shall have your ribbon for the flag
And your white skin for moonlight.

We already have our food and our drink
To last for the length of the voyage:
These are kisses and songs
With which we will intoxicate the entire crew.

We will come to land I know not where,
There, over there, on a shore
Of that lovely blue land, beneath a crazy sky,
In the flowering paradise of dreams.


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4. Give me your kisses

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 2. Thermidor, no. 21, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


My desires are not sated.
Give me your kisses, mistress!
I shall never have enough of them.
I want to drink myself to drunkenness.

Give me your kisses! Again!
I want to drink from your rosy lip.
You tell me, and I agree,
That it is always the same thing;

Yet it is always new!
I am not strict with myself as a drinker:
One of those who drink so much
That they drown in the bottom of their glass.

Madwoman, you too must become intoxicated.
Let yourself go, and be drunk!
Give your kisses as if
You only had one day to live.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

5. The treasure

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Le trésor", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 2. Thermidor, no. 24, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


You present to my desires an eternal meal.
You can always give, you never impoverish yourself.

To rejunvenate the flower of your rosy caresses,
You need only appear after an absence.

When I spend more than a day without seeing your blue eyes,
I find a renewed zest in your love.

Your mouth has kept the freshness of dawn.
As even before having had you, I want to have you again.

Your charms are like the evergreen laurel,
Which keeps its springtime, even in the depth of winter.

Your body, full of secrets, knows the art of rebirth.
I shall never see the innermost parts of your being.

Your voluptuous body resembles that treasure-trove
Where the Nibelungen accumulated their gold.

One can disperse it as one throws sand.
Some of it always remains. It is inexhaustible.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

6. Dainty roundels

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Rondeaux mignons", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 2. Thermidor, no. 6, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Camille Erlanger, Ange Flégier, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


The dew
Flies off and rises back to the heavens
Once the radiant sun
Has kissed it.
And thus the tears in my eyes
Evaporate, when you will,
Into dew.

Nightingale,
Your sweet song beneath the boughs
Seems like the hoarse voice
of Punch
When my beloved
Sings with her perfumed voice,
Nightingale.

The swallow
Comes back when spring
Has chased away the dark south winds
With beating wings.
Thus your pealing laughter
Brings back from my youth
The swallow.

My loves
Are like a wine that jars
And breaks up autumn's
Velvet.
And I sing and I festoon,
And I laugh when I begin to sing of
My loves.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

7. Abdication

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 2. Thermidor, no. 33, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


Tell me anything! Take me anywhere!
Everything will please me as long as it is your will.
As for me, I can no longer will anything and I am mad.
You will be the hurricane and I will be the leaf.

Take me anywhere! Tell me anything!
Whatever the country, the moment, your whim,
I will only see you, I will only hear you.
The world is a stage and you its sole actress.

Tell me anything! Take me anywhere!
I will do whatever you want without compunction.
Everything! Nothing! Anything! Anywhere! I am crazy
I am no longer a man, a "me". I am your plaything.

My heart wants nothing more. Your desire is its desire.
You have poured the wine of love to the top of my tumbler.1
Like the initiate of the great ancient mystery,
I have eaten from the drum and drunk from the cymbal.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 A play on words that is not readily translatable, as "timbale" is also the French word for kettledrum.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

8. Autumn Sonnet

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Sonnet d'automne", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 3. Brumaire, no. 1, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


Ah! Autumn comes to our loves as it does to our years!
However much we try not to believe or expect it,
The vexing season arrives, step by step,
And becomes a bouquet of our gleaned hours.

In its floating dress of faded hues,
Made of red velvet and red damask,
Its flesh of over-ripe fruit still has lures,
But its mouth has the smell of pale sun-flowers.

Its large eyes are clouded, like a stormy sky.
Selfish, cunning and mad, it plays
At killing birds and ripping off leaves.

O bad season, sower of remorse,
Here you are, then. Soon, whether you like it or not,
All my woods will be bare and all my birds dead.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

9. The witches

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Les sorcières", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 3. Brumaire, no. 27, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


O anger, o jealousy,
Witches with clawed fingers
And red singed faces,
Angels of neglected loves,

I penetrated your lair
To know the truth.
Sick at heart, one enters,
And leaves with wounded heart.

In your filter
And your black still
You distilled for me the horrible philtre
That bites me like an asp.

In your infernal forge,
Where hatred is the hammer,
Your paw forged for my throat
The cutting edge of a knife.

And it is with your blade,
It is with your liquor,
That I have bruised my poor soul
And inebriated my poor heart.

Witches of the cavern,
O hussies, I curse you.
You have made an Avernus1
Out of my divine paradise.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Avernus: ancient name for a crater near Cumae, Italy. In the Aeneid of Virgil, it is the entrance to the underworld.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

10. Rediscovered air

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Air retrouvé", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 3. Brumaire, no. 13, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): César Antonovich Cui, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


Nothing is over. Everything starts afresh.
The final parting is always postponed!
It is like some old snatch of romance
That one sang for a whole day.

One moment you think you have forgotten it;
You walk without a care.
But the banished ritornello
Gestates in the back of the memory.

One fine day, when one lends an ear
To some vague noises, one is surprised
To hear the little bee
Still humming in its hive.

And one finds oneself repeating without respite
That forgotten bit of romance.
One returns to the old dream.
Nothing is over. Everything starts afresh.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

11. The black boat

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Le bateau noir", written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 3. Brumaire, no. 33, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Georges Adolphe Hüe, Georges Sporck, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


I want to take a boat without a compass,
Without oars, without rigging and without sails,
To go, beneath a starless sky,
At random through the crazy sea.

O vapour, boil and scream with rage!
Turn, turn, bitter propeller!
Ship's whistle, cry out with joy and delight,
Like a sated petrel in the storm.

To the deafening swell of the tides,
Wettened by the spray and the rain,
Eyes weeping from the salt and soot,
In the unleashed ice floes of the North,

In the pits of swirling maelstroms,
On the rocks of black-toothed reefs,
Near sharks opening their jaws,
Living tombs of the drowning dead,

Dying of hunger, thirst and fever,
I shall go I know not where, alone and wild,
And then perhaps on my mouth
I shall no longer have the taste of your lips.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

12. Winter's day

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 4. Nivôse, no. 1, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Julián Aguirre, Auguste Chapuis, César Antonovich Cui, Ernest Moret, Nikolay Aleksandrovich Sokolov, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


The sky is numb.
On the naked earth
The snow has come...
On my heart too.

In the darkened air
The last leaves
Roll in the ruts.
My happiness too.

It is cold here.
The quails, the thrushes,
Have left our shores.
My mistress too.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

13. Remembrance

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 4. Nivôse, no. 28, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


Often I think of nothing, like some dumb creature.
Suddenly a word buzzes and goes through my head,
A word heard long ago,
One of those insignificant words in which your whole being dwelt;
And I sense the rebirth of a thousand echoes of my past
In that lost echo.

I remember the year, the month, the day, the hour,
And I close my eyes without saying anything, and I weep.
For in that idle word
I hear all the voices of my happy youth
As one hears, at the bottom of a hollow shell,
The whole sea singing.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

14. Anguish

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

    Contact:

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    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), no title, written 1877, appears in Les Caresses, in 4. Nivôse, no. 18, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA RUS
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): César Antonovich Cui, Ernest Moret, Florent Schmitt, Nikolay Aleksandrovich Sokolov, Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

See other settings of this text.


Where live? In what shadow
Stifle my boredom?
My sadness is darker
Than the night.

Where die? Under what wave
Drown my bitter mourning?
My sorrow is deeper
Than the sea.

Where flee? In what manner
Slaughter my remorse?
My pain is stronger
Than death.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

15. Somber pleasures

Language: English after the French (Français)

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2007 by Corinne Orde, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) by Jean Richepin (1849 - 1926), "Sombres plaisirs", appears in Les Caresses, in 4. Nivôse, no. 22, Paris, Éd. M. Dreyfous, first published 1882 ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Louis Vierne. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


It would doubtless be nobler and more manly
To fold one's tired and bruised arms across one's heart
And not to let out pitiful cries
Like a child, lost in the night on the highway.

One should, as with a repulsive cadaver,
Bury one's love, and burn its remains,
And sing if need be, and yell out that one is tipsy,

And, with a smile, drink one's tears drop by drop.
But one finds relief in the tears and the weeping,
And the mad rage. In the same way - sailors - your mothers,
When you are drowned by the inhuman swell,

Tear up pebbles at the edge of the bitter whirlpool,
And, throwing them to the waves with cries of hatred,
Appease their suffering by outraging the sea.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

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