by Detlev von Liliencron (1844 - 1909)
Translation © by Emily Ezust

Tod in Ähren
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): ENG FRE
Im Weizenfeld, [in]1 Korn und Mohn,
Liegt ein Soldat, unaufgefunden,
Zwei Tage schon, zwei Nächte schon,
Mit schweren Wunden, unverbunden.

Durstüberquält und fieberwild,
Im Todeskampf [den Kopf erhoben]2.
Ein letzter Traum, ein letztes Bild,
Sein brechend Auge schlägt nach oben.

Die Sense rauscht im Ährenfeld,
Er sieht sein Dorf im Arbeitsfrieden,
Ade, ade, du Heimatwelt -
Und beugt das Haupt und ist verschieden.

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Detlev von Liliencron, Adjutantenritte, Zweite Auflage, Berlin, Schuster & Loeffler, 1896, page 14.

1 Zemlinsky: "im" (typo?)
2 Zemlinsky: "sein brechend Auge schlägt nach oben" (from the fourth line)

Authorship:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in Spanish (Español), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist ; composed by Carlos Suffern.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Emily Ezust) , "Death among the corn", copyright ©
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , "Mort dans les blés", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 12
Word count: 63

Death among the corn
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
In the wheatfield, among corn and poppies,
lies a soldier, undiscovered
now for two days already, and two nights;
with heavy wounds, unbound.
 
Tormented by thirst and wild with fever,
in the throes of death, [he lifts his head]1.
A last dream, a last image,
he rolls his breaking eyes upwards.
 
The scythe whispers in the cornfield,
he sees his village in peaceful toil,
adieu, adieu, you world of home -
and bows his head and departs.

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Zemlinsky: "he rolls his breaking eyes upwards"

Authorship:

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- https://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.


Based on:

 

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 12
Word count: 77