by Eduard Mörike (1804 - 1875)
Translation © by Charles James Pearson

Ritterliche Werbung
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): ENG
"Wo gehst du hin, du schönes Kind?"
"Zu melken, Herr!" -sprach Gotelind.

"Wer ist dein Vater, du schönes Kind?"
"Der Müller im Tal!" -sprach Gotelind.

"Wie, wenn ich dich freite, schönes Kind?"
"Zu viel der Ehre!" -sprach Gotelind.

"Was hast du zur Mitgift, schönes Kind?"
"Herr, mein Gesichte!" -sprach Gotelind.

"So kann ich dich nicht wohl frein, mein Kind."
"Wer hat's Euch geheißen?" -sprach Gotelind

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Charles James Pearson) , "Chivalrous Courting", copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Charles James Pearson

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 10
Word count: 65

Chivalrous Courting
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
 "Where are you going, pretty child?"
 "Milking, Lord!" said Gotelind.
 
 "Who is your father, pretty child?"
 "The miller in the valley!" said Gotelind.
 
 "What if I set you free, pretty child?"
 "Too great an honor!" said Gotelind.
 
 "What have you for a dowry, pretty child?"
 "My face, Lord!" said Gotelind.
 
 "Then I guess I can't set you free, my child."
 "Who asked you?" said Gotelind.

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Charles James Pearson, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.
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Based on

 

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 10
Word count: 66