Ego flos campi
Language: Latin 
1  Ego flos campi, 
   et lilium convallium.
2  Sicut lilium inter spinas,
   sic amica mea inter filias.
3  Sicut malus inter ligna silvarum,
   sic dilectus meus inter filios.
   Sub umbra illius quem desideraveram sedi,
   et fructus ejus dulcis gutturi meo.
4  Introduxit me in cellam vinariam;
   ordinavit in me caritatem.
5  Fulcite me floribus, 
   stipate me malis,
   quia amore langueo.
6  Læva ejus sub capite meo,
   et dextera illius amplexabitur me.
7  Adjuro vos, filiæ Jerusalem, per capreas 
   cervosque camporum, ne suscitetis, neque evigilare 
   faciatis dilectam,  
   quoadusque ipsa velit.
8  Vox dilecti mei; 
   ecce iste venit,
   saliens in montibus, 
   transiliens colles.
9  Similis est dilectus meus capreæ, hinnuloque cervorum.
   En ipse stat post parietem nostrum,
   respiciens per fenestras, 
   prospiciens per cancellos.
10 En dilectus meus loquitur mihi.
   [Surge, propera, amica mea, 
   columba mea, formosa mea, et veni:]1
11 jam enim hiems transiit; imber abiit, et recessit.
12 Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra;
   tempus putationis advenit:
   vox turturis audita est in terra nostra;
13 ficus protulit grossos suos;
   vineæ florentes dederunt odorem suum.
   Surge, amica mea, speciosa mea, et veni:
14 columba mea, in foraminibus petræ, 
   in caverna maceriæ,
   ostende mihi faciem tuam,
   sonet vox tua in auribus meis:
   vox enim tua dulcis, 
   et facies tua decora.
15 Capite nobis vulpes parvulas quæ demoliuntur vineas:
   nam vinea nostra floruit.
16 Dilectus meus mihi, et ego illi,
   qui pascitur inter lilia,
17 donec aspiret dies, et inclinentur umbræ.
   Revertere; 
   similis esto, dilecte mi, capreæ,
   hinnuloque cervorum super montes Bether.

G. Ghedini sets lines 8-10
G. Palestrina sets lines 8-10 in (at least) one setting - see below for more information
I. Pizzetti sets line 5 in (at least) one setting - see below for more information
I. Pizzetti sets lines 10-13 in (at least) one setting - see below for more information
G. Palestrina sets lines 16-17 in (at least) one setting - see below for more information

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

See also G. Jackson's I am the rose of Sharon.

See also Daniel-Lesur's Dialogue.

1 omitted by Ghedini and Palestrina.

Authorship:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):


The text above (or a part of it) is used in the following settings:

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2010-11-22
Line count: 51
Word count: 247

I am the rose of Sharon
Language: English  after the Latin 
1  I am the rose of Sharon,
   and the lily of the valleys.
2  As the lily among thorns,
   so is my love among the daughters.
3  As the apple tree among the trees of the wood,
   so is my beloved among the sons.
   [I sat down under his shadow with great delight,
   and his fruit was sweet to my taste.]1
4  He brought me to the banqueting house,
   and his banner over me was love.
5  Stay me with flagons,
   comfort me with apples:
   for I am sick of love.
6  His left hand is under my head,
   and his right hand doth embrace me.
7  I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem,
   by the roes, and by the hinds of the field,
   that ye stir not up, nor awake my love,
   till he please.
8  The voice of my beloved!
   Behold, he cometh
   leaping upon the mountains,
   skipping upon the hills.
9  My beloved is like a roe or a young hart:
   behold, he standeth behind our wall,
   he looketh forth at the windows,
   showing himself through the lattice.
10 [My beloved spake, and said unto me]2,
   Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away.
11 For, lo, the winter is past,
   the rain is over and gone;
12 the flowers appear on the earth;
   the time of the singing of birds is come,
   and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land;
13 the fig tree putteth forth her green figs,
   and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell.
   Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
14 O my dove, that art in the clefts of the rock,
   in the secret places of the stairs,
   let me see thy countenance,
   let me hear thy voice;
   for sweet is thy voice,
   and thy countenance is comely.
15 Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines:
   for our vines have tender grapes.
16 My beloved is mine, and I am his:
   [he feedeth among the lilies]3.
17 Until the day break,
   and the shadows flee away,
   turn, my beloved,
   and be thou like a roe or a young hart
   upon the mountains of Bether.

J. La Montaine sets lines 1-3
D. Sisco sets lines 10-12
H. Purcell sets lines 10-13, 16
H. Skempton sets lines 10-14

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by La Montaine (the setting ends "...among the sons.")
2 omitted by Skempton.
3 omitted by Purcell, with "Alleluia" appended. (The setting ends "... and I am his. Alleluia.")

Authorship:

Based on:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2010-07-10
Line count: 52
Word count: 368