by Peter Cornelius (1824 - 1874)
Translation Singable translation by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

Zur Drossel sprach der Fink
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): CAT ITA
Zur Drossel sprach der Fink:
"Komm mit, liebe Drossel, komm' eilig, komm' flink!
Heut' tanzen die Blumen im moosglatten Wald,
Komm' mit, liebe Drossel, komm' eilig, komm' bald!
 
Wir setzen uns auf die Aeste,
Und [musiziren]1 zum Feste,
Und schauen zu, wie sie tanzen, von fern--
Ich habe die Blumen so gern!"
 
Da flogen zum Walde die zwei;
Wie flogen sie eilig um Walde, juchhei!
"Frisch auf!" rief der Fink, als die Blumen er sah;
"So tanzet nun, Drossel und Fink sind da!"

Und Fink und Drossel singen,
Die Blumen [hold sich umschlingen]2,
Und tanzen froh über Thal und Höhn--
Wie tanzten die Blumen so schön!
 
Und als der Tanz nun aus,
Da flogen der Fink und die Drossel nach Haus,
Die Blumen [auch]3 schlossen die Kelchblätter zu,
Und [gingen nach fröhlichem Tanze zur]4 Ruh'.

Als Fink und Drossel sich schieden,
So recht von Herzen zufrieden,
Da rief der lustige Fink noch von fern:
"Ich habe die Blumen so gern!"

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Gedichte von Peter Cornelius, eingeleitet von Adolf Stern, Leipzig: C.F. Kahnt Nachfolger, 1890, pages 83-84

1 d’Albert : "musiciren"
2 d’Albert : "den Reigen schlingen"
3 Omitted by d’Albert
4 d’Albert : "hielten nach fröhlichem Tage nun"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in English, a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist , no title ; composed by Eugen d'Albert.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CAT Catalan (Català) (Salvador Pila) , "El pinsà digué al tord", copyright © 2013, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Amelia Maria Imbarrato) , "Al tordo parlò il fringuello", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 24
Word count: 160

The Thrush sings loud today
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
The Thrush sings loud today:
"Come Linnet, oh come let us hasten away!
The flow'rs have a dance in the deep mossy shade.
Come quickly dear Linnet, we'll fly to the glade!

"And there in the branches hidden 
make festive music unbidden,
and watch afar how they dance through the hours,
I do love the beautiful flowers!"

Then swiftly the wo did fly;
away to the wood and they cheerily cry!
"Now Linnet and Thrush, come, ah dance with a will
sweet flow'rs that are standing so shyly and still!"

Then sweetly the birds are singing,
the woods all jubilant ringing,
and gaily dance all the flow'rets so fair.
With measureless merriment there!

The joyous day is past,
and Linnet and Thrush they fly homeward at last;
the dancing is over, the flower petals close,
and softly the breeze of the evening blows.

Afar where the shadows are falling,
the Thrush is merrily calling:
"How swift have passed all the midsummer hours.
I do love the beautiful flowers!"

About the headline (FAQ)

Note: translation to English from the d'Albert score

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 24
Word count: 168