Translation Singable translation by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

Lustwandelnd schritt ein Mädchen
Language: German (Deutsch) 
Available translation(s): ENG
Lustwandelnd [schritt]1 ein [Mädchen]2
In kühlem Waldesgrund,
Und als sie dort sich bückte,
Zum Strauß sich Blumen pflückte,
Da kam ein bunter Falter 
Und küßte ihren Mund.

"Verzeih' mir," sprach der Falter, 
"Verzeih' mir mein Vergeh'n, 
Ich wollte Honig nippen
Und hatte deine Lippen,
Dein rothes, rothes Mündchen 
Für Rosen angeseh'n."

Da sprach zu ihm das Mädchen: 
"Für diesmal, kleines Ding,
Will ich dir gern vergeben;
Doch merke dir daneben: 
Nicht blühen diese Rosen 
Für jeden Schmetterling."

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Iris, Pariser & Wiener Damen-Moden-Zeitung, XI. Jahrgang, IV. Band, 4. Lieferung (23. Oktober 1859), page 157

1 Rittershaus, Spielter: "ging"; further changes may exist not noted above.
2 Meyer-Helmund: "Mägdelein"; further changes may exist not noted above.

Authorship:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English [singable] (Anonymous/Unidentified Artist) , "The maiden and the butterfly"
  • ENG English (Sharon Krebs) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Mme. Picamal Carcanade) , "La jeune fille et le papillon"


Research team for this text: Peter Donderwinkel , Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 18
Word count: 77

The maiden and the butterfly
Language: English  after the German (Deutsch) 
In gay mood strolled a maiden
Down cool still forest glade,
And while o'er rosebush bending,
The flow'rs and fair face blending,
There came a brilliant butterfly,
And kiss'd her lips so red.

"Forgive me," said the culprit,
"Forgive my trespass rude;
As past I came, low flitting,
From every flower sipping,
Thy dainty, rosy mouth, near,
I took for sweetest bud."

Then spoke to him the maiden:
"For this time, small one, sly,
I do forgive thee gladly;
But deem thou not, too madly, 
That this rose bloomest newly
For every butterfly."

From a d'Albert score.

Authorship:

Based on:

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive):

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Harry Joelson

This text was added to the website: 2008-05-18
Line count: 18
Word count: 93