by William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)
Translation by François-Victor Hugo (1828 - 1873)

Music to hear, why hear'st thou music...
Language: English 
Available translation(s): FIN ITA
Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy.
Why lovest thou that which thou receivest not gladly,
Or else receivest with pleasure thine annoy?
If the true concord of well-tunèd sounds,
By unions married, do offend thine ear,
They do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the parts that thou shouldst bear.
Mark how one string, sweet husband to another,
Strikes each in each by mutual ordering,
Resembling sire and child and happy mother,
Who, all in one, one pleasing note do sing.
  Whose speechless song, being many, seeming one,
  Sings this to thee: "Thou single wilt prove none."

About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in Dutch (Nederlands), a translation by Albert Verwey (1865 - 1937) ; composed by Johannes Röntgen.
  • Also set in French (Français), a translation by Claude Duboscq (1897 - 1938) ; composed by Claude Duboscq.
  • Also set in Hungarian (Magyar), a translation by Lőrinc Szabó (1900 - 1957) , "Shakespeare szonettjeiből VIII", first published 1921? ; composed by Viktor Vaszy.
  • Also set in Japanese (日本語), a translation by Tsubouchi Shōyō (1859 - 1935) ; composed by Elliot Weisgarber.
  • Also set in Romanian (Română), a translation by Ion Frunzetti ; composed by Nicolae Coman.
  • Also set in Russian (Русский), a translation by Samuil Yakovlevich Marschak (1887 - 1964) , "Сонет VIII" ; composed by Dmitry Borisovich Kabalevsky.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Researcher for this text: Jeroen Scholten

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 14
Word count: 110

Toi dont la voix est une musique,...
Language: French (Français)  after the English 
Toi dont la voix est une musique, pourquoi écoutes-tu si mélancoliquement la musique ? 
Ce qui est doux ne heurte pas ce qui est doux ; la joie se plaît à la joie.
Pourquoi aimes-tu ce que tu goûtes ainsi sans gaîté, 
ou du moins goûtes-tu avec plaisir ce qui t'attriste ?
Si le juste accord des notes assorties, 
mariées par la mesure, blesse ton oreille, 
ce n'est que parce qu'elles te grondent mélodieusement de perdre 
dans un solo la partie que tu dois au concert.
Remarque comme les cordes, ces suaves épousées, 
vibrent l'une contre l'autre par une mutuelle harmonie ; 
on dirait le père et l'enfant et la mère heureuse, 
qui, tous ne faisant qu'un, chantent une même note charmante :
  Voix sans parole dont le chant, multiple quoique semblant unique, 
  te murmure ceci : » Solitaire, tu t'anéantis. «

About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2010-08-16
Line count: 14
Word count: 142